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Nevada Commercial Office Space for Lease & Executive Office Suites to Rent in Nevada

 

Nevada is a state located in the western region of the United States. The capital is Carson City and the largest city is Las Vegas. The state's nickname is Silver State, due to the large number of silver deposits that were discovered and mined there. "Sagebrush State" and "Battle Born State" are its alternative nicknames. In 1864, Nevada became the 36th state to enter the union, and the phrase "Battle Born" on the state flag reflects the state's entry on the Union side during the American Civil War. Nevada is bordered by California to the West, Oregon and Idaho to the North, Utah to the East and Arizona to the South.

 

Eight days prior to the presidential election of 1864, Nevada became the 36th state in the union. Statehood was rushed to the date of October 31 to help ensure Abraham Lincoln's re-election on November 8 and post-Civil War Republican dominance in Congress as Nevada's mining-based economy tied it to the more industrialized Union.

Nevada achieved its current southern boundaries on May 5, 1866 when it absorbed the portion of Pah-Ute County in the Arizona Territory west of the Colorado River, essentially all of present day Nevada south of the 37th parallel. The transfer was prompted by the discovery of gold in the area, and it was thought by officials that Nevada would be better able to oversee the expected population boom. This area includes most of what is now Clark County.  In 1868 another part of the western Utah Territory, whose population was seeking to avoid Mormon dominance, was added to Nevada in the eastern part of the state, setting the current eastern boundary.

 

Mining shaped Nevada's economy for many years; when Mark Twain lived in Nevada during the period described in Roughing It, mining had led to an industry of speculation and immense wealth. Both mining and population declined in the late 19th century. However, the rich silver strike at Tonopah in 1900, followed by strikes in Goldfield and Rhyolite, again put Nevada's population on an upward trend.

 

Unregulated gambling was common place in the early Nevada mining towns but outlawed in 1909 as part of a nation-wide anti-gaming crusade. Because of subsequent declines in mining output and the decline of the agricultural sector during the Great Depression, Nevada re-legalized gambling on March 19, 1931, with approval from the legislature. At the time, the leading proponents of gambling expected that it would be a short term fix until the state's economic base widened to include less cyclical industries. However, re-outlawing gambling has never been seriously considered since the industry has become Nevada's primary source of revenue today.

 

The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Nevada's total state product in 2007 was $127 billion. Resort areas such as Las Vegas, Reno, Lake Tahoe, and Laughlin attract visitors from around the nation and world. In FY08 the total of 266 casinos with gaming revenue over $1m for the year, brought in revenue of $12 billion in gaming revenue, and $13 billion in non-gaming revenue. In portions of the state outside of the Las Vegas and Reno metropolitan areas, mining and cattle ranching are the major economic activities. By value, gold is by far the most important mineral mined. Nevada has the most hotel rooms per capita in the United States. According to the American Hotel and Lodging Association there are almost 200,000 hotel rooms.

 

McCarran International Airport (LAS) in Las Vegas is the busiest airport serving Nevada. The Reno-Tahoe International Airport is the other major airport in the state.  Amtrak's California Zephyr train uses the Union Pacific's original transcontinental railroad line in daily service from Chicago to Emeryville, California serving Elko, Winnemucca, Sparks, and Reno. Amtrak Thruway Motorcoaches also provide connecting service from Las Vegas to trains at Needles, California, Los Angeles, and Bakersfield, California; and from Stateline, Nevada, to Sacramento, California.

 

Greyhound Lines intercity buses serve Las Vegas, Reno, Henderson and several smaller communities state-wide.

The state is also served by the following Interstate routes: Interstate 80 – San Francisco to Turnpike, New Jersey via Sacramento, Reno, Salt Lake City, Des Moines and Toledo Interstate 15 – San Diego to the Canadian Border in Montana via Las Vegas and Salt Lake City.

 

Although Nevada is not well-known for its professional sports, the state takes pride in college sports, most notably the University of Nevada, Reno Wolf Pack of the Western Athletic Conference and the UNLV Runnin' Rebels of the Mountain West Conference.

 

This bustling US State offers office space to lease in Nevada as well as executive office suites in Nevada available on a flexible basis.  These different types of offices for rent in Nevada are available with the added benefit of companies having access to meeting rooms and Nevada virtual offices in this thriving US state.  For help in securing the most competitively priced deal on offices to lease in Nevada or commercial office space in Nevada, please contact Nevada’s flexible office space expert via http://www.freeofficesearch.com or call us Toll Free: (888) 840-3463. We guarantee to be able to assist you today. 



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