BS1 Serviced Offices to Rent | BS1 Offices to Let

Office Space in BS1 with a variety of flexible serviced office space to rent, meeting every budget & office requirement.




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High Street
Bristol
BS1
Bristol Office Space | Serviced Offices to Let Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in High Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Admin support
  • High speed Internet
  • Parking on-site / nearby
  • Flexible terms
  • Lift/elevators
  • Staffed reception
Serviced Offices to Rent Bristol Bristol Virtual Offices
 



Victoria Street
Bristol
BS1
Bristol Office Space | Serviced Offices to Let Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Victoria Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Admin support
  • Flexible terms
  • Lift/elevators
  • Air Conditioning
  • Furnished offices
  • Meeting rooms
Serviced offices from £295 / desk Virtual Offices from £49 / month
 



Lewins Mead
Bristol
BS1
Bristol Office Space | Serviced Offices to Let in Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Lewins Mead
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Admin support
  • Flexible terms
  • Lift/elevators
  • Air Conditioning
  • Furnished offices
  • Meeting rooms
Office Space in Bristol; from £325/desk/month
 



Little King Street
Bristol
BS1
Bristol City Centre Office Space | Serviced Offices to Let Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Little King Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Air Conditioning
  • High speed Internet
  • Virtual offices
  • Flexible terms
  • Meeting rooms
Pricing available on request Pricing available on request
 



Prince Street
Bristol
BS1
Serviced Offices to Let Bristol | Office Space in Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Prince Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Admin support
  • Furnished offices
  • Meeting rooms
  • Air Conditioning
  • High speed Internet
  • Parking on-site / nearby
Office pricing available on request Virtual Office pricing on request
 



Park Street
Bristol
BS1
Bristol City Centre Office Space | Serviced Offices to Let Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Park Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space
  • Flexible terms
  • Telephone system
  • Furnished offices
Serviced office pricing available on request
 



Redcliffe Way
Bristol
BS1
Office Space Bristol Coworking Space | Serviced Offices to Let in Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Redcliffe Way
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Flexible terms
  • Meeting rooms
  • Virtual offices
  • Furnished offices
  • Staffed reception
Office Space in Bristol; from £260-£275/month/desk; Coworking Space in Bristol Virtual Offices in Bristol; from £25/month
 



Lower Castle Street
Bristol
BS1
Rent Office Space in Bristol | Serviced Offices to Let in Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Lower Castle Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Air Conditioning
  • High speed Internet
  • Parking on-site / nearby
  • Flexible terms
  • Lift/elevators
  • Staffed reception
Offices in Bristol from £400/month Meeting Venues in Bristol
& Virtual Offices in Bristol
 



Orchard Street
Bristol
BS1
Office Space in Bristol Serviced Offices to Let in Bristol Quote me on Bristol offices in Orchard Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Admin support
  • High speed Internet
  • Parking on-site / nearby
  • Flexible terms
  • Lift/elevators
  • Staffed reception
From £350 / month Virtual Office pricing on request
 



Orchard Street
Bristol
BS1
Bristol Centre Office Space | Serviced Offices to Let Bristol Central Quote me on Bristol offices in Orchard Street
Type of offices: Serviced office space, meeting rooms & virtual offices
  • Flexible terms
  • Meeting rooms
  • Furnished offices
  • Telephone system
Serviced office pricing available on request
 

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BS1 Serviced Offices to Let & Commercial Office Space for Rent in Bristol, BS1

 

Bristol, BS1, in the South West of England, is England's sixth, and the United Kingdom's eighth most populous city. The town of Brycgstow, "the place at the bridge” in Old English existed by the beginning of the 11th century, and under  Norman rule acquired one of the strongest castles in southern England.   Bristol borders the counties of Somerset and Gloucestershire, and to the south east is close to the historic city of Bath and Gloucester to the north. The city is built around the River Avon, and it also has a short coastline on the Severn Estuary, which flows into the Bristol Channel.  Bristol is one of the group of eight English Core Cities established in 1995 as a partnership to promote their common interests as the major cities in the English Regions outside London.   Bristol is a city, a unitary authority area (where a single local authority is responsible for a variety of services for a district that elsewhere are administered separately by two councils usually county and district).   Bristol is also unusual having been a city with county status since medieval times and is a ceremonial county. The county was expanded to include suburbs such as Clifton in 1835, and it was named a county borough in 1889, when the term was first introduced.   However, in April 1974, it became a local government district of the short-lived county of Avon but regained its independence and county status in 1996, when the county of Avon was abolished.    

 

Bristol received a Royal Charter in 1155 and was granted County status in 1373. On the basis of tax receipts, Bristol, along with Norwich and York ranked amongst the top three English cities after London from the 13th century until the Industrial Revolution during latter part of the 18th century. The rapid rise of Liverpool, Birmingham and Manchester during the Industrial Revolution put paid to this pre eminence.

 

Bristol is now considered the largest centre of employment, education and culture in the region.   Historically its prosperity has been linked with the sea and the commercial Port of Bristol was originally in the city centre before being moved to the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth and the Royal Portbury Dock is on the western edge of the city boundary.    However more recently the economy has come to depend on more contemporary industries such as the creative media, electronics and aerospace.    As a consequence of this the city centre docks have been regenerated as a centre of heritage and culture.   Bristol was among the first cities to adopt the idea of town twinning and is currently twinned to seven.

 

Bristol is served by two principal railway stations - Bristol Temple Meads, near the centre of the city,  which is serviced mainly by First Great Western including regular high speed trains to London Paddington as well as local and regional services and CrossCountry trains.   There is also a limited service to London Waterloo from Bristol Temple Meads, operated by South West Trains.   The other, Bristol Parkway, is located to the north of the city and is mainly served by high speed First Great Western services between Cardiff and London, and CrossCountry services to Birmingham and the North East.   Bristol's principal surviving suburban railway is the Severn Beach Line to Avonmouth and Severn Beach. The Portishead Railway was closed to passengers under the Beeching Axe, but was relaid for freight only in 2000–2002 as far as the Royal Portbury Dock with a Strategic Rail Authority rail-freight grant.

 

The city is connected by road on an east–west axis from London to West Wales by the M4 motorway, and on a north–southwest axis from Birmingham to Exeter by the M5 motorway. Also within the county is the M49 motorway, a short cut between the M5 in the south and M4 Severn Crossing in the west. The M32 motorway is a spur from the M4 to the city centre.  The city is served by Bristol International Airport (BRS), at Lulsgate, which has seen substantial investments in its runway, terminal and other facilities since 2001.

 

Public transport in the city consists largely of its bus network, provided by several companies .   There are also scheduled coach links to most major UK cities. Private car usage in Bristol is high, and the city suffers from congestion, Bristol is motorcycle friendly; the city allows motorcycles to use most of the city's bus lanes, as well as providing secure free parking.  Since 2000 there have been plans but never the funding for a light rail system as part of the Local Transport Plan.  There are several road building schemes supported by the local council, including re-routing and improving the South Bristol Ring Road and There are also three park and ride sites serving the city.  The central part of the city has water-based transport, operated by the Bristol Ferry Boat, Bristol Packet and Number Seven Boat Trips providing leisure and commuter services on the harbour.   Bristol was named "England's first 'cycling city'" in 2008 and has a number of urban cycle routes, as well as links to National Cycle Network routes to Bath and London, to Gloucester and Wales, and to the south-western peninsula of England.

 

Evidence of human activity from the Palaeolithic era has been found in the area. There are Iron Age hill forts near the city and much evidence of the link with the Romans and a connection to Bath via a Roman Road.    The port of Bristol began to develop in the 11th century  around the original junction of the River Frome with the River Avon, adjacent to the original Bristol Bridge and just outside the town walls. By the 12th century Bristol was an important port, handling much of England's trade with Ireland.   A new stone bridge was built in 1247, which was replaced by the current Bristol Bridge in the mid-18th century and the town was extended to incorporate neighbouring suburbs, becoming a county in its own right in 1373.  Bristol also became a centre of shipbuilding and manufacturing and was the starting point for many important voyages, notably Cabot’s 1497 voyage of exploration to North America.  The 14th century saw Bristol as one of England's three largest medieval towns after London, on the eve of the Black Death of 1348–49. The plague resulted in a prolonged pause in the growth of Bristol's population through most of the 15th and 16th centuries. The Diocese of Bristol was founded in 1542, with the former Abbey of St. Augustine, becoming Bristol Cathedral. Traditionally this is equivalent to the town being granted city status. During the 1640's English Civil War the city was occupied by Royalist military, after they overran Royal Fort, the last Parliamentarian stronghold in the city.

 

Bristol saw a revival in its fortunes with the rise of England's American colonies in the 17th century and the rapid 18th century expansion of England's part in the slave trade.  It became centre for the Triangular trade together with Liverpool.  Manufactured goods were taken to West Africa and exchanged for Africans who were then transported across the Atlantic in inhumane conditions and sold or exchanged for plantation goods such as sugar, tobacco, rum, rice and cotton which were then bought back to England together with a small number of slaves who were sold to the aristocracy as house servants, some eventually buying their freedom. During the height of the slave trade, from 1700 to 1807, more than 2,000 slaving ships were fitted out at Bristol, carrying a (conservatively) estimated half a million people from Africa to the Americas and slavery.

Bristol however failed to capitalize on this prosperity and keep pace with the changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution.   The wars with France in 1793 and the abolition of slavery in 1807 also caused a breakdown in maritime commerce.  The passage up the heavily tidal Avon Gorge, which had made the port highly secure during the Middle Ages, had become a liability which the construction of a new  Floating Harbour in 1804–9 failed to overcome because of costs and subsequent excessive harbour dues.   However, the 19th century saw a huge rise in Bristol’s population supported by new industries and growing commerce.   Bristol was particularly associated with the noted Victorian engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who designed the Great Western Railway between Bristol and London Paddington, two pioneering Bristol-built ocean going steamships, the SS Great Britain and SS Great Western, and the Clifton Suspension Bridge.

 

Bristol's strong nautical ties meant that maritime safety was an important issue in the city. During the 19th century Samuel Plimsoll, "the sailor's friend", campaigned to make the seas safer; he was shocked by the overloaded cargoes, and successfully fought for a compulsory load line on ships which carries his name even today.

 

Bristol, as a major sea port, has a long history of trading commodities and now major imports are motor vehicles, grain, timber, fresh produce and petroleum products. As well as Bristol's mercantile connections, the city's economy is reliant on the aerospace industry, defence, the media, information technology and financial services sectors, and tourism.  The financial services sector employs around 59,000 in the city and the high-tech sector is important with some 50 micro-electronics and silicon design companies including international names.    In 2005, the then Chancellor of the Exchequer recognised Bristol's ties to science and technology by naming it one of six "science cities", and promising funding for further development of science in the city. Bristol is the UK's seventh most popular destination for foreign tourists, and the city receives nine million visitors each year.

 

Bristol's manufacturing activities expanded to include aircraft production by the Bristol Aeroplane Company at Filton in the 20th century.  The company was famous for the World War 1 Bristol fighter and the Second World War Blenheim and Beaufighter and in 1950s became one of the country's major manufacturers of civil aircraft.  However Filton’s greatest claim to fame is the 1960’s key role in the Anglo French Concorde project. The aerospace industry remains a major segment of the local economy.

 

Bristol is home to two major institutions of higher education: the University of Bristol, a "redbrick" chartered in 1909, and the University of the West of England, formerly Bristol Polytechnic, which gained university status in 1992. The city also has two dedicated further education institutions, and three theological colleges, and129 infant, junior and primary schools, 17 secondary schools, and three city learning centres. It has the country's second highest concentration of independent school places, after an exclusive corner of north London including Red Maids' School, which claims to be the oldest girls' school in England, having been founded in 1634.

 

Today Bristol has 51 Grade I listed buildings, 500 Grade II* and over 3,800 Grade II buildings in a wide variety of architectural styles, ranging from the medieval to the 21st century. In the mid-19th century, Bristol Byzantine, an architectural style unique to the city, was developed, of which several examples have survived. Buildings from most of the architectural periods of the United Kingdom can be seen throughout the city as can surviving elements of the fortified city and castle dating back to the medieval era.  These building survived despite extensive bombing and subsequent damage during the Bristol Blitz in the Second World War.  Redevelopment is ongoing and has provided for new shopping centres, office buildings, and the major reinvention of harbour side.  A new £500 million shopping centre opened in 2008 amidst claims from developers and politicians that Bristol would become one of England's top ten retail destinations.

 

In 2009, Bristol was selected as one of the world's top ten cities by international travel publishers Dorling Kindersley in their Eyewitness series of guides for young adults.   The city is famous for its theatres, music, media and film industries; its museums and galleries, and was a finalist for the 2008 European Capital of Culture, but the title was awarded to Liverpool.   In 2010, Performing Rights Society for Music announced that Bristol is the most musical city in the UK, based on the number of its members born in Bristol in relation to the size of its population.  Bristol can also lay came as the birth place or home of many leading writers; poets; painters; actors and scientists.

 

Bristol has two Football League clubs: Bristol City and Bristol Rovers, as well as a number of non-league clubs. Bristol Rovers is the oldest professional football team in Bristol, formed in 1883.  The city is also home to a Rugby  Union club, a first-class cricket side, and a Rugby League Conference side. The city has several athletics clubs and also stages an annual half marathon. Senior ice hockey  has returned to the city and Bristol hosts an annual International Balloon Fiesta, a major event for hot-air ballooning in the UK. 

 

Although Bristol is best known for its historic significance and famous sons, it is also famous for the number and variety of its institutions and other corporate and professional businesses.   Bristol is a much sought after area on many levels and fulfils most business needs. The City area has much to commend in terms of location and transport .It offers flexible serviced offices both in new build and historic buildings; corporate buildings and offices to let on terms that are more traditional as well as state of the art virtual offices. For help in securing the most competitively priced deal on serviced office space to rent in Bristol or commercial offices to let in this historic City of Bristol, please contact your local commercial property expert via http://www.freeofficesearch.co.uk or call our BS1, Bristol office directly on 0117 314 9480. We guarantee that a member of our commercial office team will assist you with your office search and save you money.  



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